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I've been collecting slang and and publishing books about it for 30 years. My database containswords and phrases and they keep coming. One thing I've learnt - the more slang changes, to half-inch the well-known phrase, the more slang stays the same.

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Dog food drug slang

Standard English laid down such terms as drunk or sexual intercourse centuries ago. Nang, imported from the Caribbean where it means ostentation or style and rooted in Mende nyanga, showing off, is one of the better-known examples. Albeit with a special sauce of sexiness and outsider cool.

Dog food drug slang

A "Channel swimmer" is one who injects heroin. As for groovy, it began life meaning conservative "stuck in a groove" ; now the young use it to mock those who pose as latter-day freaks. Take your pick from:A couple of chips short of an order, a butty, a happy meal or even a circuit-board, a few bob short of Married couples sex swapping pound, a few snags short of a barbie, one brick short of a load, one sandwich short of a picnic, one stop short of East Ham yes, slag or two wafers short of a communion.

It is far from alone.

Opiates / heroin - mhrb

Dope still means drugs, as well as affirming excellence. It came from Dutch buizen, to drink to excess and beyond that buise, a large drinking vessel and the first examples were spelt bouse. Never more so than with those alleged poles of morality, good and bad.

Dog food drug slang

Quite simply, in slang's looking-glass environs, bad means good. Yolo - you only live once - was the flavour of the month, even year, not that long ago.

British slang

Among them - has your mother sold her mangle? Mass-marketed, he was the idealised stud of Hugh Hefner's "Playboy philosophy", at his incomparable best the taboo-shattering stand-up Lenny Bruce.

The term "Aunt Hazel" is also used — although this should not be confused with "Aunt Mary" marijuana and "Aunt Nora" cocaine. Usually we can give them, although a surprising are simply playing with standard English.

Modernity lacks the 18th Century's excellent "you are a thief and a murderer: you have killed a baboon and stolen his face" but there is much on offer. Slang, not so much a language where's the grammar? One can also shake a wicked foot.

American-australian slang dictionary - robert p o'shea

This mix of Jamaican patois, American hip-hop, Cockney classics and the coinages of youthful Londoners has added much to slang's vocabulary. On the list are ddug words for heroin alone, including "old steve", "nurse", "lemonade", "hairy", "george", "dog food", "rambo", "elephant", "scott", "gravy", "jack", "helen", "henry", "jones", "witch", "horsebite", "dead on arrival" and "pangonadalot". All gone, not to mention forgotten.

In cant, the language of criminal beggars, rum meant good. The over-riding image is "not all there".

Food | definition of food at www.beststeroidsformass.eu

Slang, as noted, pooh-poohs political correctness and has no time for euphemism, however justified, and while mental-health professionals might deplore the fact, lists a wide range of terms it defines as "mad". My database containswords and phrases and they keep coming. It is a vocabulary, after all, in which do good means to make substantial profits from crime and get good to become drunk. One thing I've learnt - the more slang changes, to half-inch the well-known phrase, the more slang stays the same.

Urban dictionary: dog food

Like many of slang terms for cash, the inference is "something you need", e. Nang Fodo may stay the same but the lexis evolves. If we hit the booze too heavily, we get a booze belly, and maybe a trip on the booze bus, Australia's mobile breath-tester.

Dog food drug slang

But there are real novelties. There was rum booze, which was good strong beer, there was a rum diver who was a competent pickpocket and a rum doxy who was a pretty girl.

Police given 3, word 'a to z of drugs slang' to stay ahead of criminals

Then, aroundit all changes. Diss image foox image captionRun DMC: "Don't try to diss me" Slang, being subversive to its very core, doesn't have much time for rules but like all language it has to accept one - words are always older than you think. Cool marches on, re-minted for every youthful generation.

Other phrases from the list are "to babysit", which is to guide someone through their first drug experience, and "on the bricks", to mean released from prison. We know that it comes out of US regional use, and is so far first recorded in Each, as Mackay noted, was "the slang par excellence of the Londoners, and afforded them a vast dryg. Let's take diss.

Some were laid to rest; others flourish. I've been collecting slang and and publishing books about it for 30 years. Booze: Alcohol, drink, and as a verb, to drink.